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Despite it all, #EveryWinMatters, this World Cancer Day

Hearing you have cancer when you’re a young person is life shattering. And dealing with it during a pandemic makes life even harder. Band together with young people this World Cancer Day as they share what they’ve achieved in the face of cancer and Covid-19 – from stepping out of bed to stepping on stage. Because, despite it all, every win matters.

Despite it all, #EveryWinMatters, this World Cancer Day

Hearing you have cancer when you’re a young person is life shattering. And dealing with it during a pandemic makes life even harder. Band together with young people this World Cancer Day as they share what they’ve achieved in the face of cancer and Covid-19 – from stepping out of bed to stepping on stage. Because, despite it all, every win matters.

Grab your exclusive t-shirt

Get your limited edition t-shirt today, designed by the amazing Jules Von Hep

Wear hope on your heart

We’ve teamed up with Jules for a second World Cancer Day and we hope you love the outcome as much as we do!

Jules said, “This year’s t-shirt has been designed around the idea of hope. Hope is something we have all relied on in the last year, but even more so for young people on their cancer journey. It’s an honour to be able to design and sell these environmentally friendly t-shirts to help raise money for this incredible charity!”

We’ve teamed up with our friends at Teemill to make sure all t-shirts are entirely sustainable. They’re printed to order which means there’s zero waste, they arrive in no yucky plastic wrapping and when you’re done with wearing your tee, you can send it back to Teemill and they will reuse the materials and produce another amazing garment. Now that’s sustainable fashion!

T-shirts are available in both adults (£25) and kids (£20) sizes and will be on sale until Sunday 20 Feb.

Find out more on how they’re made here.

Wear hope on your heart

We’ve teamed up with Jules for a second World Cancer Day and we hope you love the outcome as much as we do!

Jules said, “This year’s t-shirt has been designed around the idea of hope. Hope is something we have all relied on in the last year, but even more so for young people on their cancer journey. It’s an honour to be able to design and sell these environmentally friendly t-shirts to help raise money for this incredible charity!”

We’ve teamed up with our friends at Teemill to make sure all t-shirts are entirely sustainable. They’re printed to order which means there’s zero waste, they arrive in no yucky plastic wrapping and when you’re done with wearing your tee, you can send it back to Teemill and they will reuse the materials and produce another amazing garment. Now that’s sustainable fashion!

T-shirts are available in both adults (£25) and kids (£20) sizes and will be on sale until Sunday 20 Feb.

Find out more on how they’re made here.

Band together for young lives

Get your limited edition band now and raise a wrist for young people facing cancer.

Sachin

During my cancer treatments one of the hardest things I had to deal with mentally was how the illness became the centre of my whole life and how it almost suffocated every other facet of what made me me.

It wasn’t just the chemotherapy and it’s side effects or how surgery severely impacted (and continues to impact) my mobility. But every thing I seemed to do was centred around dealing with this disease.  The way it effected even the simplest of things like eating , sleeping and even dressing myself was so draining on me. It began to make me forget that I was more than just a cancer patient as it had become such and overwhelmingly large aspect of my life. 

However my first ball at St Andrews and my first cricket match after cancer are some of the proudest moments of my life as they represent that in spite of all that difficulty I was able to move on and live life like anyone else . I was able to realise I am so much more of a person than this affliction and that I could live life how I wanted to and not how cancer dictated me to 

Sachin

During my cancer treatments one of the hardest things I had to deal with mentally was how the illness became the centre of my whole life and how it almost suffocated every other facet of what made me me.

It wasn’t just the chemotherapy and it’s side effects or how surgery severely impacted (and continues to impact) my mobility. But every thing I seemed to do was centred around dealing with this disease.  The way it effected even the simplest of things like eating , sleeping and even dressing myself was so draining on me. It began to make me forget that I was more than just a cancer patient as it had become such and overwhelmingly large aspect of my life. 

However my first ball at St Andrews and my first cricket match after cancer are some of the proudest moments of my life as they represent that in spite of all that difficulty I was able to move on and live life like anyone else . I was able to realise I am so much more of a person than this affliction and that I could live life how I wanted to and not how cancer dictated me to 

Crystal

In 2016, I was diagnosed with facial osteosarcoma, a rare form of bone cancer in my right jaw. I was an energetic, friendly and confident young woman who aspired to be an actress until suddenly, my face was changed by cancer.
I had spent the next two years hiding in my room, ashamed of what cancer had done to me and my appearance. Although I was grateful that the surgeons removed the tumour, it did not release the physical and emotional trauma. So I prayed for a way out.  Then, finally, like a beacon of light – theatre.Theatre had always been the one consistent thing in my life that gave me joy. I loved performing, feeling the energy onstage, falling into the character I played, and the smell and sounds of the building always gave me a sense of home. But, I did not believe it was possible, looking the way I did to perform on stage again. Until, with my mother’s encouragement and the belief of my now drama school, LAMDA  both proved to me that the only limitations I have are the ones I set in my mind.Despite it all, I did not make my cancer scars define me because those I valued the most didn’t either. So instead, I followed my heart and dream of becoming an actress, and each day I live it’s with intention and joy. My greatest achievement is starring in my first short film, Face it: Leonie by Miranda Walker. It proved that anything is possible and that a person like me, with my experience and background, can still achieve their dreams and inspire others that they can too.

Crystal

In 2016, I was diagnosed with facial osteosarcoma, a rare form of bone cancer in my right jaw. I was an energetic, friendly and confident young woman who aspired to be an actress until suddenly, my face was changed by cancer.
I had spent the next two years hiding in my room, ashamed of what cancer had done to me and my appearance. Although I was grateful that the surgeons removed the tumour, it did not release the physical and emotional trauma. So I prayed for a way out.  Then, finally, like a beacon of light – theatre.Theatre had always been the one consistent thing in my life that gave me joy. I loved performing, feeling the energy onstage, falling into the character I played, and the smell and sounds of the building always gave me a sense of home. But, I did not believe it was possible, looking the way I did to perform on stage again. Until, with my mother’s encouragement and the belief of my now drama school, LAMDA  both proved to me that the only limitations I have are the ones I set in my mind.Despite it all, I did not make my cancer scars define me because those I valued the most didn’t either. So instead, I followed my heart and dream of becoming an actress, and each day I live it’s with intention and joy. My greatest achievement is starring in my first short film, Face it: Leonie by Miranda Walker. It proved that anything is possible and that a person like me, with my experience and background, can still achieve their dreams and inspire others that they can too.

Chloe

Despite being diagnosed with Neuroblastoma at 15 years old, I went on to do my A-levels whilst still on cancer treatment. I didn’t want cancer to set me back and stop me from achieving goals, especially as it had already stolen so much independence and many ‘normal’ teenage experiences from me.

When I finally finished 18 months of treatment, I struggled both physically and mentally. I felt I had completely lost my path in life – my confidence and self-esteem was at rock bottom. Despite it all I did not let this stop me. I pushed myself out of my comfort zone and went full steam ahead to achieve personal goals.

Influenced by my experience of going through cancer treatment, I decided my path in life was to go into children’s nursing. I pushed through the low confidence and self-esteem to apply to university to do children’s nursing and got offered a place at three different universities despite it being a very competitive course with limited places.

After a three year course at university, I qualified as a children’s nurse, with a first class degree! Going into children’s nursing was so important, as I wanted to support families through the challenging times they face whilst in hospital. My proudest moment in my career as a nurse would be when I got a ‘Daisy Award’ which is given to extraordinary nurses, I got three nominations from parents of children in my care. So, despite it all I succeeded in achieving my biggest most challenging ambition and more. By overcoming challenges with both emotional issues and long-term effects not only to become a nurse, but to be an extraordinary one!

Chloe

Despite being diagnosed with Neuroblastoma at 15 years old, I went on to do my A-levels whilst still on cancer treatment. I didn’t want cancer to set me back and stop me from achieving goals, especially as it had already stolen so much independence and many ‘normal’ teenage experiences from me.

When I finally finished 18 months of treatment, I struggled both physically and mentally. I felt I had completely lost my path in life – my confidence and self-esteem was at rock bottom. Despite it all I did not let this stop me. I pushed myself out of my comfort zone and went full steam ahead to achieve personal goals.

Influenced by my experience of going through cancer treatment, I decided my path in life was to go into children’s nursing. I pushed through the low confidence and self-esteem to apply to university to do children’s nursing and got offered a place at three different universities despite it being a very competitive course with limited places.

After a three year course at university, I qualified as a children’s nurse, with a first class degree! Going into children’s nursing was so important, as I wanted to support families through the challenging times they face whilst in hospital. My proudest moment in my career as a nurse would be when I got a ‘Daisy Award’ which is given to extraordinary nurses, I got three nominations from parents of children in my care. So, despite it all I succeeded in achieving my biggest most challenging ambition and more. By overcoming challenges with both emotional issues and long-term effects not only to become a nurse, but to be an extraordinary one!